The following post contains excerpts from Week 2 of the Fortify Program. To find more useful tips to aid you in recovery, check out the full program.


With more and more talk these days about “porn addiction,” you might be wondering whether that even applies to you.  You may be asking yourself, “Do I have an addiction?”

Many people tend to talk about addiction like a light switch that is either on or off—either you’re addicted or you’re not.

Researchers have actually found that pornography habits—like other problems—fall along more of a spectrum. This makes sense, since our body, minds and past experiences are all unique. 

On one end of the spectrum is, “I’m free and I don’t even think about it” – and on the other end is feeling completely stuck. No one is fixed in a certain place on the spectrum, but we also don’t slide up and down this continuum quickly. 

That’s because of the brain’s ability to develop habits, which are defined as a behavior pattern regularly followed until it has become almost involuntary.

 Rather than an on-off light switch, forming habits is more like a dimmer switch that gradually changes from light to dark and back again—leading both your brain and behavior in a certain direction over time.

 If that’s true, then maybe freedom won’t necessarily come all at once, although it can happen that way for some. While staying open to exciting shifts, these insights about the brain and body can invite us to stay patient in the change process and encourage us to welcome small, gradual changes as part of our journey to eventually reaching lasting freedom.

Where Are You On The Addiction Spectrum?

Rather than only asking “Do I have an addiction?”, the better question is, “How deep of a habit have I formed?” Or “where am I on this addiction spectrum?”  

One way to answer that is to ask, “how long have I been using pornography – a couple of months, a year, multiple years?”  Obviously, that has an impact on the depth of the habit.

Another thing to ask yourself is “how often do I turn to porn – occasionally, regularly or frequently?”

For some people, they may go a long while – even months, without turning to porn – but eventually, they go back to it. We would call those occasional users. Other, more regular, users may have a hard time staying away for a month. By comparison, frequent users may turn to porn multiple times a week—and on a more compulsive level. 

At this most intense level, the pattern becomes “addictive” or what the medical field calls “dependency,” which is an irresistible  compulsion that takes priority over almost everything else in life.

There Is Hope

No matter how strong of a habit, realize this: there’s a way out. Fortify has been designed with this broad spectrum of struggle in mind—from milder to stronger levels of intensity. And whatever the details, we’re going to do everything we can to help you create a plan unique to your own situation—gathering together everything that may possibly help you, specifically, move towards freedom.    

No matter the details, one thing we probably all have in common is knowing how it feels to be controlled and driven by an outside force. Even if the label of “addiction” doesn’t apply, getting completely away from this stuff can be frustrating and even feel impossible at times.

So what do you say? Have you ever joined a rebellion? Are you with us?

 You make the call. If you’re in, we’re ready!


To get started, sign up at fortifyprogram.org and get access to even more information, research, and encouragement.